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1.4 Wine serving tips from a Sommelier

We are very lucky to have our very own sipp  inhouse sommelier (a fancy wine waiter), Rodrigo, who has worked in some of london’s best restaurants. Here are  his tips for creating that professional experience at home.

Room temperature is a lot more specific than it sounds, 16-18 degrees. A wine left to warm in a centrally heated  house may exceed that. If you serve a wine too warm, it may seem heavy and flabby.

To have the best wine experience, and get the most out of your wine, always serve at the correct temperature. Don’t start too bold. If you’re serving several wines over the course of an evening, don’t start off with the most powerful or bold flavoured wine.

Start the evening with a sparkling or lighter wine and work your way up to something more robust. You wouldn’t start  a meal with a boeuf bourguignon and follow it with a chilled watercress soup. Avoid being a dribbler. Take your time pouring the wine.

Both red and white wines are best poured slowly. With red wine fill the glass up to a third full and with white wine, aim to half fill the glass.  With bubbly, pour in a small amount of wine into the glass to start with to avoid over-stimulating the bubbles. Give the bubbles time to settle, and then finish pouring the glass until it's three-quarters full.

Water. Whether you’re serving wine with or without food, make sure you serve water.Water cleanses the palate and helps you keep tasting the  wines flavours and nuances for longer, it will also help ward off hangovers by keeping you hydrated.

Don’t be afraid to experiment. It’s easy to stick with what you know but your favourite sipp could be out waiting for you to discover it. With 10,000+ varieties of wine in the world, it’s crazy that generally speaking, drinkers only experience 12! Be the Indiana Jones of wine, keep having adventures.







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